Brown Tick

Article Featured on PetHealthNetwork

Overview/Risk of Canine Anaplasmosis or Dog Tick Fever

Ticks are not only disgusting little blood-sucking creatures, they are dangerous, too. Ticks are one of the primary couriers for transmitting certain infectious diseases, collectively called “vector-borne [or, tick-borne] diseases,” of which canine anaplasmosis is one. Canine anaplasmosis can be found throughout the United States, primarily in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central states, as well as in California.

To see if anaplasmosis is in your area, visit the interactive map at dogsandticks.com and click on your region.

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Flea and Tick Prevention in Cats & Dogs

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

What Are Fleas and Ticks?

Fleas and ticks are external parasites that can cause extreme discomfort for your pet and can also cause serious diseases.

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Ehrlichiosis: What You Should Know About This Tick-Borne Disease

By DR. MARTY BECKER DVM | Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Ticks are trouble! We all know that they spread the bacteria that cause Lyme disease, but another tick-borne disease that is steadily increasing is ehrlichiosis. Once limited to western Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, the incidence of ehrlichiosis is expected to rise in those areas, as well as in southern California and the southeastern United States, according to the Companion Animal Parasite Council.

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laurelwood, animal hospital, beaverton, oregon

Lyme Disease threatens your dog’s health because ticks know how easy it is to latch onto your dog’s body for a tasty meal.  Large populations of these bloodsuckers lounge around all year in places like woody trails and campgrounds where you take your dog for walks or enjoy vacations with your family. 

There’s no magic bullet to stop the spread of ticks because climate change and reforestation has widened the range for tick infestation. What’s more frightening is that warmer winters allow hosts for ticks to survive longer. Read more

laurelwood, animal hospital, beaverton

Article by Justin Worland | Found on TIME

“This year, there are worse ticks than many of us have ever seen in our lives,” says Janet Foley, an epidemiologist at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

Ticks are roaming American forests in greater numbers this year than any in recent memory leaving thousands of humans at risk for lyme disease, say public health officials. And things could get much worse through the summer if weather conditions remain humid, spelling trouble for the people who roam in their habitat. Read more

Article by Dr. Mike Paul | Found on PetHealthNetwork

If you are not yet aware of Lyme disease, you almost certainly will be soon. Lyme disease has spread to many regions of the U.S. Lyme disease is a condition caused by an organism, called Borrelia burgdorferi. It’s not a new disease. There is actually evidence in at least one Egyptian mummy that the organism infected people 5000 years ago, according to Bay Area Lyme Foundation. That organization also says that Lyme was first observed in the United States in the 1960s, in a village called Lyme, CT. In the 1980s, Willy Burgdorfer showed the causative agent to be a bacteria transmitted in North America by deer ticks (Ixodes scapularum). Read more

Did you know that ticks are not just a spring and summer problem? You might be surprised to learn that ticks can be found year round, and not just in warmer climates. A 2010 study from the Journal of Clinical Investigation showed that some infected ticks have actually developed a type of anti-freeze glycoprotein to survive the cold. Unfortunate
ly, this means that just because winter has arrived, dog parents cannot let their guard down when it comes to ticks.
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