From the ASPCA

On Tuesday, July 21, the ASPCA will be celebrating national No Pet Store Puppies Day. This is a great chance to educate your friends and family about what happens in puppy mills and about the benefits of  adopting from a shelter or rescue group instead! Read more


From PetMD

When making the first introduction, it is best done in steps. The last thing you want to do is frighten your puppy to the point that he is reluctant or unwilling to get into his grate. Ideally, you want your puppy to get into the crate at your command. But why? Read more

By Erin Ollila | Featured on Hillspet

Bringing home a new puppy is an exciting time for both of you, but it’s not without its busy moments; your new pet needs to learn what behavior is acceptable. While showing him the ropes, consider these options for training a puppy, whether you do it yourself or hire someone to help you dictate the good and bad behavior.
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Article Featured on Hillspet.com

You knew having a puppy would be a big responsibility — and you were ready. You read up on housebreaking, worked out your commands for leash etiquette and puppy-proofed your home. And you were thrilled to discover that your new furry bundle of joy was the sweetest, most mild-mannered puppy you’d ever met. So when you first felt your dog nipping, you were truly caught off guard.

If you’re worried your puppy parenting is to blame, you’ll be relieved to know that puppy play biting is very common, even among the most well-behaved pups. But why do dogs nip? And how can you curb the habit while your dog is still young? Let’s explore the science behind nipping and ways you can train your puppy to stop this behavior.

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Original Article By PetMD

Dogs lick themselves, that’s a fact of life, but when does it get to be an issue? You may catch your pooch Read more

Original Article By PetMD

Can cats get along with dogs? The answer is simply yes, says Dr. Liz Bales, a Philadelphia veterinarian. As long as pet parents take their time and follow a few simple rules for introducing cats to dogs, there’s no reason why felines and canines can’t develop a harmonious relationship. Read more

Original Article By The Statesmen Journal

A mother terrier with her litter of five-day-old puppies and a deaf dog named Hazel were among the 108 dogs and 17 cats that arrived in Salem Saturday from high-kill shelters in Oklahoma and will soon be up for adoption.

This was the 16th flight organized by Fetch Fido a Flight, an organization that transports animals from those high-kill shelters to Oregon where they find a reprieve from euthanasia.

Each flight costs about $17,000, paid for by donations. The organization hopes to grow to support one or two flights every month.

“Dogs are being euthanized because we can’t get a plane out,” said Carole Weber, board secretary of Fetch Fido a Flight. “(Oklahoma shelters) are so backed up, it’s brutal.”

After landing in Salem, the cats and dogs were driven to SafeHaven Humane Society south of Albany.


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

Original Article By Kate Hughes from PetMD

Most pet owners have some experience dealing with fleas. After all, fleas are indiscriminate parasites, happy enough to feed off of dogs and cats, ferrets and rabbits, and, of course, humans, when the need arises. While a lot people have encountered these nasty little parasites, they know very little about them. However, despite being quite troublesome for pet owners and their furry friends, fleas are actually interesting creatures. So read on to learn more about them. As you go, it’s natural to feel a little itchy—but try not to scratch!

1. Fleas have a flexible life cycle. A flea’s life cycle can be broken down into four parts: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. The adult lays eggs on a host, which then roll off into the environment. When these eggs hatch into larvae, the larvae hunker down in the environment, feed, and go through several molts until they spin a cocoon and become pupae. Eventually, from the pupae emerge adult fleas, which then seek out an animal host for a blood meal. Under ideal conditions, this entire process takes about 21 days. However, fleas have a very flexible life cycle, and will wait until conditions are optimal to move from one stage to another. “The more warm and the more moist it is, the faster the life cycle will go,” says Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, a staff doctor at NYC’s Animal Medical Center, who specializes in small animal internal medicine and oncology. “If it’s cooler and dryer, the process slows down until the temperature goes up.”

2. While neat, this life cycle makes fleas insanely hard to eradicate. Fleas are hardy creatures. Dr. Daniel Morris, a professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in Philadelphia, says that most of the flea medications on the market will kill adult fleas, but it’s much more difficult to be rid of eggs and especially pupae. “Some products have a compound that keeps eggs from hatching, but don’t kill the pupae,” he says. This means that even if you wipe out all of the adult fleas in an infestation, the next generation might just be waiting to take up the reins.

3. During a flea infestation, treating your pet isn’t enough. You have to treat the environment too—that’s where the eggs and pupae are hiding. “I always tell my clients that killing the fleas on their pets isn’t enough. There are eggs and pupae in the carpet, in between the floor boards, and even in your car, if you have a habit of taking your dog on rides,” Morris says. Hohenhaus adds that if you vacuum during a flea infestation, you should immediately throw that vacuum bag out because any eggs and pupae you vacuum up may still be viable. “You also want to wash everything—bedding, clothes, etc.—in hot water,” she says. In the case of a particularly bad infestation, both Morris and Hohenhaus recommend enlisting the services of an exterminator.

4. Fleas can go a long time without eating. Research shows that pupae can stay in their cocoons for up to a year. Once the adults emerge, they try to find a blood meal immediately but, if necessary, can survive for one to two weeks without eating. However, it is only after they eat that they can lay eggs. They’re also indiscriminate feeders. “If you go away for a weekend and don’t realize there are fleas in your house, the moment you walk on the carpet in your living room, you’ve got flea bites up to your knees,” Hohenhaus says. “This is because the fleas are starving and they’re looking for a blood meal.”

5. A female flea can lay up to 50 eggs per day. Typically, it’s more like 20 eggs, but that means that a single prolific female flea can cause a major infestation in less than two months. “If you start with one female flea at maximum egg production, and assuming that half of the eggs are breeding females, in just 60 days you could have more than 20,000 fleas on your hands,” Morris explains. “This is how a serious infestation can happen before you even realize there is an issue.”

6. Fleas have Olympic-caliber jumping skills. It’s generally recognized that fleas are some of the best jumpers in the world, able to jump more than 150 times their body length. This ability is a necessity for the fleas’ life cycles. “If fleas are unable to jump onto an animal, they’re not going to be able to feed and then they can’t reproduce,” Hohenhaus says.

7. Indoor-only pets are not safe from flea infestations. Fleas, in all of their stages, are easy to transport from place to place. This means that even if your animals never go outside, they are still susceptible to fleas. That said, some animals are more at risk than others. An indoor cat who lives in a high-rise apartment in a major city is less likely to pick up fleas than an indoor cat who lives in a house in the woods. Also, some parts of the country—think warm and moist again—are more infested with fleas than others.

8. Your pets can develop an allergy to flea bites. According to Morris, there are two types of itching associated with fleas. The first is mild itching associated with the creepy crawly feeling of a bug on your skin. The second is a much more intense itch, which occurs when an animal develops an allergy to the proteins in a flea’s saliva. “Once an animal is allergic, the itch becomes impossible to ignore,” he says. “It’s itchy times 100.” If animals with an allergy are left untreated, the bites can become infected and require extensive veterinary care.

9. Fleas can transmit diseases that impact humans. Fleas are carriers of all sorts of bacteria, including bacteria that can cause disease in people. One of the more prominent examples is Bartonella henselae, which is the bacteria responsible for cat scratch disease.

10. Fleas can also transmit parasites. Fleas can also carry parasites, which they then transmit to their hosts. Tapeworms are most commonly transmitted by fleas. “When dogs and cats groom fleas off their bodies, they often swallow them,” Morris says. “If the flea is carrying tapeworms, they’ll then be released into the dog or cat’s intestinal tract.”

11. Flea infestations can make animals very sick. In severe infestations, fleas can consume so much of a host’s blood that the host becomes very ill. Some animals develop iron deficiency anemia, and smaller animals could even require blood transfusions. “This mostly occurs in young puppies and kittens,” Hohenhaus says. “Fleas are very efficient and effective parasites.”


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

Original Article By Paula Fitzsimmons

Think you know all there is to know about puppy and kitten nutrition? Are you aware that puppies and kittens are more sensitive to nutritional imbalances than adults, for example? Or that excess calcium intake can cause a puppy to develop orthopedic disease?

Go past Puppy and Kitten Nutrition 101 to learn lesser-known facts about their dietary needs. Then use this knowledge to provide your newest family member with the proper start in life she needs to thrive for years to come.

1. A Balanced Diet Is Even More Important for Growing Animals Than for Adults

All animals, regardless of age, need a balanced diet to thrive, but puppies and kittens are especially sensitive to nutritional imbalances, says Dr. Jonathan Stockman, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. “The requirements and the sensitivities to excess in nutrients are generally highest.”

One example is calcium, an essential dietary mineral that plays a critical role in bone development. In excess, calcium can cause a puppy to develop severe bone changes and orthopedic disease, he says. “Large and giant breed puppies are particularly sensitive to this, whereas adult dogs are able to regulate calcium absorption when the diet is high in calcium.”

2. Puppies Should Not Be Fed Adult Formula Food

Because they are sensitive to nutritional imbalances and their energy needs are greater, puppies should only be fed a growth formula diet, vets say.

Growth places the highest energy and nutrient demands than any other life stage on a dog or cat, apart from lactation, says Dr. Jessica Harris, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist at Carolina Ranch Animal Hospital in Garner, North Carolina. “The energy needs of a puppy are two-fold: 1) support the tissues already developed and 2) provide the energy required to form new tissues.”

Puppies use about 50 percent of their consumed energy for maintenance and 50 percent for new tissue development in the early growth phase, Harris says. “As the puppy gets older, the energy needed to support growth diminishes and proportionately shifts to support maintenance. Energy is provided by protein, fat, and carbohydrates. Thus, growth diets often provide a greater percentage of protein and fat to support growth than do adult maintenance diets.” Growth diets also provide optimal amounts of calcium, phosphorus, copper, and essential fatty acids, “which have an important role in bone formation and maturation, cartilage maturation, hair color, red blood cell development, and trainability.”

3. Unchecked Growth Can Be Harmful to a Dog’s Bones

Feeding a puppy to maintain her ideal body condition versus allowing maximum growth promotes the optimal rate of bone development, says Harris, who is also a clinical nutrition instructor at the Topeka, Kansas-based Mark Morris Institute.

“The adult weight and size of the animal is not impacted by whether the growth rate is rapid or slow, however, the risk of skeletal deformities increases with the rapidity of growth.”

Determining a puppy’s body condition score (BCS) is a reliable way to determine normal growth rate. Body scoring helps you gauge if your dog is maintaining a healthy muscle mass and body fat index. It’s something you can practice at home, using your hands and visual observation.

4. Young Animals Need Multiple Feeding Times to Thrive

Animals rely on reserves for energy in between meals, says Harris. “These energy reservoirs are stored glycogen in the liver or fat depots throughout the body. Ketones produced by the breakdown of lipid or amino acids can also provide energy. As young animals often have limited reserves and are at risk for the development of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), multiple meals offered throughout the day best averts the onset of lethargy, trembling, weakness, lack of coordination, and seizures.”

Puppies should eat at least three meals per day, and kittens younger than 6 months should be fed more often, “For example, four to six times a day,” says Dr. Donna Raditic, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist with Nutrition and Integrative Medicine Consultants based in Athens, Georgia.

This should be accompanied by close monitoring—with your veterinarian—of body weight, muscle condition score (MCS), and BCS, Raditic adds. She encourages pet parents to use a food gram scale to weigh food and monitor daily caloric intake.

“Just like human weight loss programs will use food gram scales to educate us about portion size and caloric intake, weighing your puppy/kitten’s diet right from the start will help you to be sure you are feeding the correct amount,” she says. “Adjusting intake in grams is much more accurate than going from one-eighth cup to one-fourth cup.”

5. Nutritional Needs Differ by Breed Size

There are a few key differences in the nutrient needs of large breed puppies as compared to small- to medium sized breeds, says Harris. Most of these focus on reducing the risk of developing orthopedic disease.

“Although the development of musculoskeletal disorders is multi-factorial and a complicated disease process, it has been correlated nutritionally with calcium, phosphorus, the calcium-phosphorus ratio, vitamin D, and energy intake,” she explains. “Large breed growth diets contain a little less than 1 percent calcium and more than adequately meet the growing large breed puppies’ calcium requirement. Small- to medium-sized breeds are less sensitive to slightly overfeeding or underfeeding calcium, and as a result, the level of calcium in foods for these puppies have a broader margin of safety.”

6. A Gruel Formula Can Help Ease the Weaning Process

Providing your companion with porridge-like formula during weaning—which starts when an animal is about 3 to 4 weeks old and is marked by the eruption of baby teeth and an interest in solid food—can help ease the process, Harris says.

“It has been largely successful to introduce a gruel made by blending a canned growth food with a canine/feline liquid milk replacer in a 1:1 ratio,” she says. “Alternatively, one part dry commercial food can be ground in a food processor and mixed with three parts of canine/feline liquid milk replacer.”

She says the young animal should always have access to the formula, and that it should be replaced three to four times a day. It will spoil and promote bacterial growth if left out at room temperature for prolonged periods.

It’s during playtime that a young animal typically encounters the gruel, then will progressively consume small amounts. “As the young animal’s interest increases, the liquid portion of the mixture can be gradually reduced until they are consuming only the canned or dry commercial growth diet, usually between 6 and 9 weeks of age,” Harris says. “This transition is a delicate balance between the mother, the young, and the owners and requires close monitoring and patience.”

Not all brands of milk replacer are equal, however. “Care should be taken when selecting the milk replacer, as not all brands meet the minimum nutrient requirements for growth per American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) for all labeled species.”

7. Feeding Methods are Not One-Size-Fits-All

Pet parents have three options for feeding growing puppies and kittens: Free choice, which makes the food available 24/7 (like an all-day buffet); time-limited, where food is out for a set period of time; and amount-limited, where portions are pre-determined.

“Each have their own benefits and drawbacks and what is right for one animal may not be the best option for another,” Harris says. “Therefore, it is strongly recommended that the [owner] have a discussion with their veterinarian about the best feeding option for their growing pet.”

Size and breed are factors that can impact that decision. For example, “free-feeding puppies can be problematic for the large, giant breeds,” says Raditic, who also co-founded the Companion Animal Nutrition & Wellness Institute.

“If rapid growth is induced, this may drive the genetics of these breeds at risk for developmental orthopedic disease (for example, hip or elbow dysplasia),”she says. “For small and medium breeds, it can be problematic increasing body fat—for these breeds are at risk for obesity and to be overweight.”

8. Working with Your Companion’s Natural Behavior Can Provide Additional Health Benefits

Working with an animal’s instincts can promote health and well-being. “Simulating normal feeding behavior will increase activity, reduce boredom, help with weight management and prevent obesity, and strengthen the bond between cat and owner,” says Dr. Amy Learn, a veterinarian at Cary Street Veterinary Hospital in Richmond, Virginia.

Cats are innate hunters, so work to add enrichment to their feeding regimen. “For example, using feeding toys or embracing a cat’s three-dimensional world,” Raditic says.

Dogs evolved as hunters, as well as scavengers. “These activities were a substantial part of their daily time budget and are not currently utilized when we hand them a bowl of food,” Raditic says. You can still honor a dog’s natural behavior, however, by allowing her to work for her food “with puzzle toys or programs like ‘learn to earn,’ which have been shown to provide mental stimulation,” explains Learn.

The more we understand about a young puppy or kitten’s dietary needs, the better care we’re able to provide. Early nutrition deeply impacts puppies and kittens and sets the stage for longevity and quality of life, Raditic says. “Every pet parent needs to understand and own this preventative care for their furry companion.”


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

Many healthy people are still walking, biking, working or otherwise spending time outdoors and some are experiencing symptoms of bad air such headaches, cough, itchy eyes and more. Can pets experience this, too?

Chief medical officer and veterinarian Jason Nicholas of Preventive Vetof Portland said Tuesday that pets who already have respiratory issues, including cats with asthma or dogs with collapsing tracheas, are most at risk of complications from poor air quality. Also, elderly pets or young kittens or puppies can also feel the affects, as well as snub-nosed cats and dogs (otherwise known as brachycephalic breeds including pugs, French bulldogs, and Persian cats).

If owners notice pets having difficulty breathing, increased coughing or a roaring bark unlike their usual bark (in dogs), it might be time to consult a vet. To help protect pets against the effects of unhealthy air quality, Nicholas recommends owners take these precautions:
  • Keep your pets indoors as much as possible. Dogs will need breaks outside but limit the time and do not engage in strenuous activities or play. Keep cats indoors.
  • Keep windows closed if possible and use fans to circulate the air. Nicholas believes an air purifier can be helpful if the filters are properly cleaned or changed. Also, any filters on air conditioning systems or heat pumps should be changed during hazardous air events and again once the possibility of bad air has passed.
  • Hydrate your pet as much as possible. Besides offering plenty of cool clear water, humidifiers can help keep moisture in the air and helps cells in the trachea, nose and lungs stay healthy.
  • To help keep active pets satisfied when they’re not allowed outdoor exercise, Nicholas recommends “brain games” like trick training, hide-and-seek games, nose-work (sniffing for hidden food treats) and food puzzles to help engage your pet.
Keeps pets indoors as much as possible and avoid strenuous exercise during bad air quality days.

Pet birds are especially hypersensitive to air quality, according to Nicholas. If a pet bird is acting lethargic or refusing to clean themselves for more than a day, it’s best to contact a veterinarian.

Although livestock isn’t Nicholas’ specialty he recommends plenty of fresh water for hydration for farm animals, as well as “low-dust” feeding if possible. Also, fans in stalls or barns can help with air quality.

The National Weather Service in Portland expects the air quality to improve by Thursday. But the wildfire season is still in full swing and we could experience hazardous conditions again before the season is over.

 


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com