Cats associate loud noises with danger, therefore lots of cats become stressed as a result of fireworks and the loud noises they make.The noise and flashes can cause cats to run off in a panic and, sadly, every year our emergency vets see hundreds of pets who have been involved in road traffic accidents after being spooked by loud bangs.

Read more

source:https://www.avma.org/resources/pet-owners/petcare/july-4-safety

Fireworks, picnics and other Fourth of July traditions can be great fun for people; but all of the festivities can be frightening and even dangerous for animals. Noisy fireworks and other celebrations can startle animals and cause them to run away; holiday foods can be unhealthy; summer heat and travel can be dangerous; and potentially dangerous debris can end up lying on the ground where pets can eat or play with it. Read more

7 Ways to Protect Your Pet During the Holiday Season

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas might be the most wonderful times of the year, but they can also be some of the most dangerous for cats and dogs. From deliciously rich holiday fare to enticingly shiny decorations, the holiday season brings plenty of risky temptations for animals. Even if you are vigilant all year with your pets, it’s easy to get distracted with the extra responsibilities and extra people coming and going this season. Don’t let a pet accident or emergency put a damper on your festivities. Follow our expert advice to help keep your animals safe this holiday.

Read more

7 Ways to Protect Your Pet During the Holidays

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas might be the most wonderful times of the year, but they can also be some of the most dangerous for cats and dogs. From deliciously rich holiday fare to enticingly shiny decorations, the holiday season brings plenty of risky temptations for animals. Even if you are vigilant all year with your pets, it’s easy to get distracted with the extra responsibilities and extra people coming and going this season. Don’t let a pet accident or emergency put a damper on your festivities. Follow our expert advice to help keep your animals safe this holiday.

Read more

Keep Your Pets Safe While Trick-Or-Treating this Halloween

Article Featured on Douglass Feed & Pet Supply

Halloween can be an un-intentionally scary time for pets. In fact, veterinarians see many pet injuries that can be avoided this time of year. With all of the shrieks and howls coming our way, we thought it would be a good idea to make sure they are happy ones, in keeping with the fun atmosphere of the holiday. It’s always a good idea to keep aware that the festivities may not be as fun for our pets as it is for the kids, teens and adults.

To keep this Halloween from being a real-life nightmare for you and your pet, consider the following things:

Read more

July 4th fireworks can be stressful for dogs. These 6 tips can keep them calm and safe

By MUNA MOHAMED | Featured on ABC

The Fourth of July rings in the peak of summer quite literally as fireworks fly into the sky from cities to backyards alike. While the celebration is often colorful and exciting, it is also a time that can be very loud and frightening for dogs around the country, causing it to be the weekend more pets go missing than any other time of the year, according to the American Kennel Club.

Read more

National Pet Day

BY ANDREA HUSPENI | Article Featured on ThisDogLife

Today, marks National Pet Day, a holiday to celebrate our special best friends – be it your dog, cat, bunny, reptile or some other lovely creature.

For us, dogs rule the roost. They bring us so much joy, love and laughs. They never let us down, act as our perma-shrink and stick by our side through thick and thin. And while there are specific days to honor them – including National Dog Day and National Puppy Day — we don’t want this holiday to pass without letting our pups know how much we appreciate them.

Here are five ways to say I love you on National Pet Day!

1. TAKE YOUR DOG ON A MEMORABLE WALK

Go outside today, and rather than the norm, take your dog on a new adventure. Perhaps you go right instead of left, north instead of south. Not only is a change of scenery good for both or you, but new scents will be a nice surprise for your pup.

“Our daily lives with our dogs typically don’t permit them to exploit the full abilities of their incredible noses,” Alexandra Horowitz, author of Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell, tells PetMD. “We hurry them along during walks, focused on the destination rather than the journey itself.”

Dogs have a minimum of 200 million scent receptors, with some having a billion! (We, on the other hand, only have six million.) So a scent walk is the perfect opportunity to sniff. This special walk doesn’t need to be complicated; it just requires patience. When you take your dog on a new route, let her smell to her heart’s content. Don’t pull her along to keep moving when she has her nose to the ground, or tell her, “It’s time to go.” Instead, let her take it all in.

“I’ve found that when dogs are allowed to use their noses, they actually display a lot less ‘misbehavior,’” she told the outlet. “It’s as if the thing that they have decided to be their ‘work,’ barking at each approaching dog, say, or always being vigilant (and thus anxious) about where you are, can be replaced with this more natural behavior, if they are allowed to sniff. In other words, it makes them happy.”

2. MAKE BATH TIME EXTRA NICE

Okay, most dogs really don’t dig baths. They are trapped, have water spraying all over them and are cold. There is no escaping for them until after all the suds are washed away. (We have all seen the horrible bath face.)

So, why not give them a special treat during bath time? You can rub a little oil on your fingertips (we recommend a dog-friendly odorless oil or one that has a light lavender scent), and give your dog a quick face massage.

To improve your dog’s circulation, begin my massaging the top of her head to increase blood circulation. Then do light finger taps on your dog’s face to help stimulate the brain and get the blood flowing. You can also focus on the ear area, massaging your dog’s ear flaps and rubbing in circular motions around the base of the ears for air circulation, according to dog-walking site Wag. If you want to open up the sinus cavities, apply gentle pressure using your thumbs below the eyes and at the bridge of your dog’s nose. Lastly, focus on the muzzle, back of the jaw and under your dog’s chin and neck area by massaging these spots and running your fingers along them. This will help open up blood vessels, improve circulation and help with oral health, Wag says.

3. GIVE YOUR DOG A SPECIAL TREAT

All dogs love treats, and there is no better time to give your best friend one (or two), than on National Pet Day. But instead of his everyday treat, why not give him one that can also support his health – a win-win for both of you!

By adding some basic ingredients (many of them you probably already have) to a treat, you can freshen your dog’s breath, improve their oral hygiene and help take away tartar.

Here is a basic dog treat recipe that freshens breath, too:

The below recipe has parsley, which is a natural antibacterial; mint to make your dog’s breath smell nice and coconut oil, which has anti-microbial properties that can help remove harmful bacteria from your dog’s mouth, preventing plaque build up.

Pre-heat your oven to 325°

Ingredients

2 ½ cups old-fashioned oats
½ cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
½ cup fresh mint, finely chopped
1 large egg (if your dog is allergic to chicken products, substitute with ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce)
¼ cup of water, plus 1 teaspoon
3 tablespoons coconut oil (unrefined extra-virgin is best)

Put the oats in a blender or food processor and pulse until they look like flour. In a bowl, combine the mint, egg, water, parsley and oil. Add the oat flour to the bowl.

Then take out the dough, knead it and roll it out onto a floured surface (about 1/8 inch). Use a cookie cutter (we love fun designs!) to make the treats.  Place on a non-stick cookie sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until the treat are crispy and golden.

Put in an airtight container (lasts 3-4 days) and freeze the rest.

4. COOK A DELICIOUS HOME-COOKED MEAL

Not ready to go all in? You can always cook food for your dog and use it as a topper or mix it into your dog’s current kibble.

Below is a simple recipe. Keep in mind, we believe you should consult with a professional before making any diet changes.

Related: The Complete Guide to Making Home-Cooked Dog Food 

Grab your slow cooker or crockpot (6- to 8-quart is ideal). Also, if you have a food processor or blender, you can speed up the process, as it can save time on chopping up the ingredients.

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ pounds ground beef
  • 1 ½ cups uncooked brown rice
  • 1 ½ cups chopped butternut squash
  • 1 ½ cups diced carrots
  • ½ cup frozen peas (or green beans)
  • 1 to 3 cups chopped spinach
  • 4 cups of water

Add all ingredients to the slow cooker. Make sure you stir in everything and then cover and cook on low for 5-8 hours. Once done, portion out. Put some in the freezer and add some to the refrigerator (lasts about 3-4 days).

Feel free to get creative and swap out the proteins, vegetable and grains.

And you can add some supplements to balance it out, making sure your dog gets all his nutrients.

Want even more home-cooked recipes for your dog? We recommend BalanceIT’s “Auto Balancer EZ,” which allows you to choose from five groups to create a balanced recipe.

You can also check out some canine cookbooks, including Home Cooking for Your Dog, to get a few ideas.

5. PLAY AN ENGAGING GAME WITH YOUR DOG

If you haven’t gone to YouTube to see the lengths us dog parents go when we are playing with our dog, you are missing out. While fetch, tug-of-war and squeaky toys delight our dogs, there are a few special games you can add to their routine.

Interactive puzzles are a great way to provide mental stimulation for your dog – and they keep your pup busy! They can improve problem-solving skills and boost confidence.

The go-to tends to be Kongs, but there are other ones out there that we enjoy. The Odin, an interactive, treat-dispensing toy, not only will keep your dog occupied for hours, but it looks like a work of art, making it the perfect decoration for the floor. There is also the OG, Nina Ottosson’s puzzles. The games, often involving little drawers to hide treats, make it challenging for our pups. For any toy, it is important to keep an eye on your dog.


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: [email protected]

10 Tips for a Safe Thanksgiving

Article Featured on ASPCA | Image Credit: Petfinder

Thanksgiving is a time for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also a time for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too:

  • Talkin’ Turkey: If you decide to feed your pet a small bite of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria. Do not give your pet the left over carcass–the bones can be problematic for the digestive tract.
  • No Bread Dough: Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him access to raw yeast bread dough. When a dog or cat ingests raw bread dough, the yeast continues to convert the sugars in the dough to carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This can result in bloated drunken pets, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring hospitalization.
  • Don’t Let Them Eat Cake: If you plan to bake Thanksgiving desserts, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.
  • A Feast Fit for a King: While your family enjoys a special meal, give your cat and dog a small feast of their own. Offer them made-for-pets chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a food puzzle toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

Check out this handy graphic for additional safety tips courtesy of Petfinder.

10 Tips for a Safe Thanksgiving

A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays. Please visit our People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets page for more information.


Laurelwood Animal Hospital,located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: [email protected]

Tips to Keep Pets Safe from Fireworks

Article Featured on Oregon Humane Society

Fireworks can drive pets, especially dogs, into a state of panic. Every year, animal shelters have their hands full dealing with pets who bolted from their homes because they were terrified of fireworks. Sadly, many pets are never reunited with their owners. OHS suggests that pet owners take the following steps to keep their pets safe.

Read more

laurelwood

Article Found on ScienceDaily

University of Liverpool researchers are warning of a “significant peak” in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats.

Most people know that chocolate can be poisonous to dogs but may not know why. The toxic ingredient is a caffeine-like stimulant called theobromine that can lead to an upset stomach, a racing heartbeat, dehydration, seizures and in the most severe cases death. Read more