How to tell if your pet has ringworm

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Ringworm is caused by a fungus. The disease with the misleading name (it has nothing to do with a worm) is a common infection that often causes itchy red patches on the skin. Dogs, cats, and humans can be affected by the disease, which causes hair to fall out in affected areas. It’s easily transmitted between people and pets, and if someone (or some pet) in a household has it, all should be tested and treated, if needed. Treatment ranges from oral medications to topical products and can take weeks or months to resolve.

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Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

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Heartworm Treatment for Dogs: What You Need to Know

Article by DR. Marty Becker, DVM | Featured on Vetstreet.com

Odds are, you’ve visited at least one veterinary office that prominently displayed a photo or drawing of a canine heart infested with heartworms. This gruesome image illustrates what can happen to your dog when the spaghetti-like worms clog his heart.

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Contact Your Veterinarian When Your Dog Shows These Signs

Article Featured on PawFriendly.com

The following information may help you decide which conditions are absolute emergencies, and which ones may let you take a “wait and see” attitude. If your dog is sick or injured and you are unsure of the severity of the condition, it is always best to err on the side of caution, and contact your veterinarian (or emergency clinic) right away.

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Treating Oral Cysts in Dogs

By Sarah Wooten, DVM | Article Featured by PetMD

A dog is supposed to have 42 adult teeth. If your dog has less than 42 teeth and has not had any adult teeth extracted, what does it mean? While it is possible that your dog is just missing teeth (they never developed at all), there is also a possibility that a missing tooth isn’t missing at all, but unerupted or impacted under the gums.

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By John Gilpatrick | Article Featured on PetMD

Heart disease in dogs and cats can be a tough diagnosis for vets to make and for pet owners to receive. Depending on the specifics of the condition, your vet may not be able to do much, but that’s not always the case.

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The Top 10 Cat Health Problems

Turns out, cats don’t really have nine lives — so be sure to take steps to prevent these common cat health problems now.

Article by  | Article Featured on Everyday Health

Your kitty may look self-sufficient, but she depends on you to keep her in top cat health. That means scheduling regular check-ups and getting her the shots required to guard against cat illnesses. By learning about common ailments, from diarrhea in cats to urinary diseases and more, you’ll be able to spot early warning signs and get your little furball prompt treatment for any condition she may face.

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Cats are good at self-maintenance. But even your fastidious feline can’t prevent some of these more common cat diseases and health issues.

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By Matt Soniak | Featured on PetMD

Dogs bring a lot of joy into our homes, but they also bring an array of odors to contend with. We’re used to many of them, from bad breath and “Frito feet” to farts and wet dog smell. But what about a funky smell coming from a dog’s ears? While not as notably or frequently smelly as their mouths and rear ends, dogs’ ears can sometimes get a little stinky. Fortunately, the typical causes of smelly ears are relatively benign, and the fixes are pretty easy.

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vet clinic, beaverton, oregon

Article Found on PetHealthNetwork

Perhaps the most important thing to know about kidney diseasein cats is that way too many cats are affected by it. In fact, studies show that 1 in 3 cats suffer from kidney disease, reports Dr. Celeste Clements. Cats can get kidney disease for any number of underlying reasons, and even worse, it’s difficult to spot. Most cats show no outward signs of kidney disease until the problem is very advanced. Even when they do, the first signals of kidney disease in cats are easy to miss, including subtle weight lossurinating/peeing more often and drinking more water. Therefore, if you notice your cat is peeing on the floor, soaking the litter box, or if your cat is always thirsty, it’s time to visit your veterinarianRead more