How to protect your pet during the coronavirus outbreak

How to protect your pet during the coronavirus outbreak

Article Featured on WQAD

Veterinarians at Kimberly Crest Animal Hospital are taking extra precautions when it comes to their patients.

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Great Indoor Games to Play With Your Dog

Great Indoor Games to Play With Your Dog

By  | Article Featured on AKC.org

Being stuck at home, for any reason, can be a bummer for both you and your pup. But even though you’re confined inside, you can still engage in meaningful activities with your dog that can stimulate them mentally and physically. So, the next time you find yourself homebound, don’t let it spoil your fun. Try out these games and activities to keep your canine companion on their toes.

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Your pet won’t give you coronavirus, so hug away, experts say

Your pet won't give you coronavirus

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN

To the best of current scientific knowledge, can you get the coronavirus called Covid-19 from your dog or cat? Or give it to them?

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Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019
Sylar Pet Shop

Article Featured on CDC.gov

Key Points
  • Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people and others cause illness in certain types of animals.
  • Coronaviruses that infect animals can become able to infect people, but this is rare.
  • We do not know the exact source of the current outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • We do not have evidence that companion animals, including pets, can spread COVID-19.
  • We do not have evidence to suggest that imported animals or animal products imported pose a risk for spreading the 2019 novel coronavirus in the United States.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people, while others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels, and bats. Some coronaviruses, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals and do not infect humans.

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Responsible pet ownership

Responsible pet ownership

Article Featured on AVMA

Owning a pet is a privilege, but the benefits of pet ownership come with responsibilities.

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Health Tip: 7 Ways to Keep Your Pet Healthy

Health Tip: 7 Ways to Keep Your Pet Healthy

Article Featured on US News

FOR the 85 million families who own pets in the United States, your furry friends can feel like family.

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Worming Schedule for Puppies, Dogs, Kittens and Cats

Worming Schedule for Puppies, Dogs, Kittens and Cats

Article Featured on Valley Vet

Worms are probably one of the most common ailments of puppies and kittens but can be cured. Hookworms and roundworms are the most common worms found in puppies and kittens. This is a guide for deworming as recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists.

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Your Canine Etiquette Guide: Dog Park Do’s

Your Canine Etiquette Guide: Dog Park Do's

BY MIKKEL BECKER | Featured on Vetstreet.com

Your dog loves the dog park, and you love taking him there to play. But you both need to be on your best behavior while you’re there. Here are six simple ways to be a good dog park citizen and help your pooch and his friends enjoy their play time together.

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Bulbs, Corms, Tubers and Rhizomes: What Potential Toxins Are Lurking Below the Soil?

Bulbs, Corms, Tubers and Rhizomes: What Potential Toxins Are Lurking Below the Soil?

BY DR. TINA WISMER DVM, DABVT, DABT | Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Springtime flowers are beautiful, but some are potentially dangerous to our pets. The “bulb” plants can be toxic. Botanically speaking, flower bulbs come in many forms: true bulbs, corms, tubers, tuberous roots and rhizomes. With some bulb plants, only the part below the ground is problematic; with others, it is the whole plant. The plants discussed in this article are toxic to both dogs and cats unless otherwise specified (some are toxic only to cats), but keep in mind that just about any plant material, even grass, can cause mild stomach upset if eaten and a pet is sensitive to it.

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Smart Tips for Running With Small Dogs

Smart Tips for Running With Small Dogs

BY KRISTEN SEYMOUR | Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Owning a small dog has its advantages. It’s easier to find hotel rooms and apartments that allow small dogs. Small dogs eat less food (and, as you’ll know if you’ve ever been on poop scooping duty, create less waste) than their larger counterparts. And, if you’re looking for a lapdog, well — you don’t need us to tell you that having a Havanese on your lap is probably a little more comfortable than trying to make space for a Great Dane.

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