16 Free DIY Dog House Plans from The Spruce Pets

Did you know it’s National Dog House Repair Month? (Neither did we)– and we didn’t find any interesting articles about dog house *repair* but we did find some adorable DIY dog house plans at the Spruce Pets– so get out your tools and have fun building new digs for your fur baby!

 

6 Free DIY Dog House Plans from The Spruce Pets

Written by Stacy Fisher  (Source)

 

These free DIY dog house plans will make sure that your dog has a safe haven when the weather turns cold and you can take pride that you built it just for them.

Dog houses are fairly simple projects and can be usually be completed by someone with just basic building skills. They’ll take anywhere from half a day to a few days to complete and can easily be done in under $100.

Before using these free dog house plans to build your dog’s dream home, make sure that it will be the right fit for the size of your full-grown dog. Some of these dog house plans can even be customized to fit any size of a dog so be sure to look for instructions within the plans for that.

If you’re looking for more projects like these free dog house plans, you’ll want to check out the free cat tree plans and rabbit hutch plans.

1-Beginner Dog House Plan

Beginner Dog House Plan from Lowe’s Lowe’s has an excellent free dog house plan for a great-looking yet simple dog house that will make the perfect home for an average-sized dog. You’ll find a tools and materials list, an overview, cutting directions, and building instructions with illustrations.

Build a Doghouse

2-Simple A-Frame Dog House Plan

A dog inside of an A-frame dog house.

This is a basic dog house plan that’s not only easy to build but the finished dog house will look great in your yard. It can be built in less than half a day and you won’t spend over $100 for the materials.

There’s no guesswork when you build this dog house either, blueprints, a material list, step-by-step instructions, and even videos are provided for this free dog house plan.

 

 

The House of Wood has a free dog house plan that has a deck, toy box, and place for food and water.

You’ll need to sign up for their free newsletter to get the plans and you’ll be emailed a PDF with a materials list, tools list, cut list, diagrams, and step-by-step building instructions.

Over at Wood Shop Diaries, you can find more tips, photos, and even a walkthrough video to help you complete this quick and easy project.

 

4-Free Dog House Plan

A red and blue dog house.

This standard dog house plan from BuildEazy includes comments and photos from people just like you who have built this dog house.

Within the free dog house plan, you’ll find a materials list, cutting list, building instructions, and blueprints.

 

5-Pallet Dog House Plan

A wood dog house built from a free building plan

Use plywood and pallets to create this one-of-a-kind dog house that will keep your pooch safe and warm. Written directions and color photos help you put it all together.

6-Ranch Style Dog House Plan

A dog drinking water outside of a dog house.

Sunset

Looking to give your pooch the luxury he deserves? Then why not try your hand at this free dog house plan for a ranch style doghouse.

Use the diagrams, images, materials list, and instructions to build this one-of-a-kind doghouse.

 


Laurelwood Animal Hospital, located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventive medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

How do fireworks affect cats and how do I help my scared cat?

Cats associate loud noises with danger, therefore lots of cats become stressed as a result of fireworks and the loud noises they make.The noise and flashes can cause cats to run off in a panic and, sadly, every year our emergency vets see hundreds of pets who have been involved in road traffic accidents after being spooked by loud bangs.

My cat is scared of fireworks, how can I prepare them?

If your cat is sensitive to sound, try to desensitise them to the bangs long before the fireworks begin. This may involve using repeated, progressive exposure to firework noise to help them develop familiarity to it. It’s best to seek advice from a vet or animal behaviourist about this.

Make sure your cat is microchipped and the details are up to date so they can be more easily returned to you if they up going missing after fireworks.

How will I know if my cat is stressed due to fireworks?

Fireworks affect cats differently to how they affect dogs. While dogs may show clear signs of distress, it can be more difficult to identify the signs in cats.

Some cats will do all they can to hide their fear of fireworks, while others will show much more obvious signs such as dilated pupils, hissing or low grumbling or withdrawing from you. When cats are scared they’re also likely to arch their back and crouch, pin their ears back, and make slow low movements. The best thing to do is keep an eye on whether your cat’s behaviour changes and if so, it could be a sign that they are afraid of fireworks.

My cat is scared of fireworks, how can I help?

If you are concerned about how stressed your cat is as a result of fireworks, it’s worth chatting with your vet to see what options are available to help your cat feel more calm and relaxed during scary events like fireworks.

There are also over-the-counter products, such as calming collars and plugins, which claim to send calming messages to help your cat feel calm during periods of high stress or anxiety.

How to comfort a scared cat during fireworks?

  • Make sure your cat can’t harm himself should he become scared. Even the most placid of cats can occasionally bolt for cover. Also, make sure they aren’t confined to one room.
  • Keep them indoors on the night of the fireworks and block off cat flaps so they can’t escape. Also, avoid leaving home alone.
  • Keep out flashes by trying to keep your cat somewhere with no windows or by blacking-out the windows.
  • Allow access to their favourite ‘safe place’, and try to avoid constantly checking on them if they have chosen to hide there
  • Drown out the noise as best as possible by providing ‘background noise from a TV or radio.
  • Acting normal is more beneficial than overly reassuring your cat. If you act worried then your cat may think they should be worried too. Also don’t shout at your cat if he’s destructive as a result of distress — this will only upset him more
  • Provide an indoor litter tray in a convenient location. If cats are very anxious, they may avoid visiting the toilet if they feel threatened or scared

July 4th Safety Tips from the AMVA

source:https://www.avma.org/resources/pet-owners/petcare/july-4-safety

Fireworks, picnics and other Fourth of July traditions can be great fun for people; but all of the festivities can be frightening and even dangerous for animals. Noisy fireworks and other celebrations can startle animals and cause them to run away; holiday foods can be unhealthy; summer heat and travel can be dangerous; and potentially dangerous debris can end up lying on the ground where pets can eat or play with it.

Whether or not you’re planning your own Independence Day celebration, it’s important to take precautions to keep your pets safe both during and after Fourth of July festivities.

Preparing in advance:

  • Make sure your pets – cats and dogs alike – have identification tags with up-to-date information. If you have horses, you might consider marking a safety (breakaway) halter with your contact information and leaving it on your horse during this stressful time.
  • If your pets aren’t already microchipped, talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. This simple procedure can greatly improve your chances of getting your pets back if they become lost.
  • If your pets are microchipped, make sure your contact information in the microchip registry is up-to-date.
  • Take a current photo of all of your cats, dogs and horses – just in case.
  • If your pet has historically been anxious on this holiday, or if you have reason to expect potentially harmful reactions, consider behavioral therapy to desensitize your pet and reduce the risk of problems. Some pets may need medication. Consult your veterinarian or a veterinary behaviorist.
  • Make sure the environment is safe and secure. If your neighbors set off fireworks at an unexpected time, is your yard secure enough to keep your pet contained? Are pasture fences secure enough to keep horses or other livestock confined? Evaluate your options, and choose the safest area for your animals; and make improvements if needed to make the area more secure.

Safety during July 4 celebrations:

  • Leave your pets at home when you go to parties, fireworks displays, parades and other gatherings. Loud fireworks, unfamiliar places and crowds can all be very frightening to pets, and there’s great risk of pets becoming spooked and running away.
  • Consider putting your pets in a safe, escape-proof room or crate during parties and fireworks.
  • Keep horses and livestock in safely fenced areas and as far from the excitement and noise as possible.
  • If you’re hosting guests, ask them to help keep an eye on your pets to make sure they don’t escape. Placing notes on exit doors and gates can help both you and your guests remain vigilant.
  • Keep your pets inside if you or your neighbors are setting off fireworks.
  • Keep sparklers, glow sticks, fireworks, charcoal and kabob skewers away from curious pets.
  • Don’t let pets get near your barbecue grill while it is in use or still hot.
  • Avoid the urge to feed your pets table scraps or other foods intended for people. Be especially careful to keep them away from these common foods that are actually toxic.
  • Remember that too much sun and heat (and humidity!) can be dangerous to pets. Keep them inside when it’s extremely hot/humid; make sure they have access to shady spots and plenty of water when outdoors; don’t leave them outside for extended periods in hot weather; and know the signs that a pet may be overheating.
  • Never leave your pet in your car when it’s warm outside. Vehicle interiors heat up much faster than the air around them, and even a short time in a locked car can be dangerous to pets.
  • If you’re travelling out of town for the holiday, consider leaving your pets at home with a pet sitter or boarding them in a kennel. If you need to bring them with you, be sure you know how to keep them safe.
  • Follow safe food handling and hygiene practices to protect your family and guests.

After the celebrations:

  • Check your yard for fireworks debris before allowing pets outside to play or relax. Even if you didn’t set off fireworks yourself, debris can make its way into your yard, where curious animals may pick it up to play with or eat.
  • Check your pastures and remove debris to protect horses and livestock.
  • If you hosted guests, check both your yard and home for food scraps or other debris that might be dangerous to pets, such as food skewers.

Related resources:

Podcast: Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips

Microchip Information: August 15 is Check the Chip Day

 


Laurelwood Animal Hospital, located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventive medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

Why Is My Dog Not Drinking Water?

Why Is My Dog Not Drinking Water

Jennifer Grota, DVM | Article Featured on PetMD

Water is essential to life. It has even been called the most important nutrient with regards to survival. It’s very important for your dog to drink enough water to stay hydrated and healthy.

What if your dog is not drinking enough water? Here’s how to calculate how much water your dog needs along with some reasons why your dog may not be drinking the amount of water they should.

Continue reading Why Is My Dog Not Drinking Water?

Are Cats Protective of Their Humans?

Are Cats Protective of Their Humans

Published by Christine O’Brien | Article Featured on Hills Pet

Dogs are known for being fiercely devoted to their pet parents, but is there such thing as a protective cat? Learn whether your kitty feels protective of you and how they might let you know it.

Continue reading Are Cats Protective of Their Humans?

Common Causes of Chronic Vomiting in Cats

Common Causes of Chronic Vomiting in Cats

Article Featured on HealthyPets.com

Sadly, persistent vomiting in feline family members is so commonplace these days that many pet parents and even some veterinarians believe it’s somehow “normal.” However, the reality is that chronic vomiting is a sign something’s wrong.

It’s worth noting that big cats in the wild don’t routinely vomit. In addition, frequent vomiting is stressful and physically taxing. You can be sure your poor cat doesn’t enjoy doing it any more than you enjoy cleaning it up.

Common causes of chronic vomiting in kitties include an underlying medical condition, poor diet and food intolerances, enzyme deficiencies, eating too fast, too much time in between meals, hairballs (wild cats don’t get these routinely, either), constipation and toxin ingestion.

Continue reading Common Causes of Chronic Vomiting in Cats

Pet Cancer Awareness

Pet Cancer Awareness

Dr. David Hunley, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology) – Gold Coast Center for Veterinary Care | Article Featured on Whahzoo

Cancer in dogs and cats

About 1 in every 4 dogs and cats will develop some form of cancer in their lifetime, and the incidence of cancer-development increases with age (there is a higher risk in dogs and cats over 10 years of age). Most of the cancers we treat in veterinary medicine occur due to genetic factors (often breed-related), so it is difficult to avoid the development of cancer in the majority of dogs and cats. Once cancer does develop, it is important to make a diagnosis as quickly as possible so that we can evaluate the various treatment options and make a therapeutic plan based on the specific cancer type.

Continue reading Pet Cancer Awareness

Common Grooming Behavior Problems and How to Fix Them

Common Grooming Behavior Problems and How to Fix Them

Whether you groom your dog or cat yourself or take them to a professional groomer, behavior problems can cause unpleasant conflicts and create difficult situations for you and your pet. Fortunately, there are several ways you can work to correct your pet’s poor behavior and still keep them beautifully groomed.

Continue reading Common Grooming Behavior Problems and How to Fix Them

Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebites

Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebites

Article Featured on ScienceDaily

Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have just been revealed. The research team compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.

Continue reading Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebites

What are the Signs of Hip Problems in Dogs?

What are the Signs of Hip Problems in Dogs

Written by Dr. Melinda J. Mayfield-Davis, DVM, WCHP-AH | Featured on vetericyn.com

There comes a time in every dog’s life when things begin to slow down. The games of catch become less exuberant. The patter of feet racing up and down your staircase becomes a little slower, a little more cautious. The enthusiasm is still there; their eyes sparkle when you come home from work and the wagging tail goes wild when you pick up their leash.

However, if your dog is struggling with a hip issue, then you’ll notice signs of rapid physical deterioration. 

As with any loved one or family member, learning to adapt to and accommodate a physical change in your canine friend can be a trying endeavor. Watching your companion begin to wane and lose energy is one of the heartbreaking facets of being a dog owner. So, if you want your dog to age gracefully, it’s essential that you learn about the early warning signs of hip problems in dogs so that you can immediately take preventative and proactive counter measures.

Continue reading What are the Signs of Hip Problems in Dogs?