Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

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Does My Dog Have Bad Digestion?

Article Featured on Purina

Your Dog’s Digestive Health

Do you suspect your dog’s food or allergies are upsetting his digestion? Digestive problems, including gastrointestinal disease, are among the most common reasons dogs are brought to their veterinarians. Digestive problems can be the result of:

  • Food allergies.
  • Infections.
  • Dietary indiscretion.

Dangers of Your Dog’s Digestive Discomfort

Many digestive problems may resolve after a dog’s digestive system is given a chance to rest, but more serious conditions can occur. Weight loss, dehydration and debilitation are all possible consequences of serious digestive problems.

Signs and Symptoms of Upset Digestion

Pay attention to what your dog eats and how it affects him. Some close observation may help you determine the cause of your dog’s discomfort, and will give you more information to share with your veterinarian.

If your dog has an acute or persistent digestive problem, contact your veterinarian, who can determine the appropriate treatment.


Laurelwood Animal Hospital, located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

7 Ways to Protect Your Pet During the Holidays

7 Ways to Protect Your Pet During the Holidays

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas might be the most wonderful times of the year, but they can also be some of the most dangerous for cats and dogs. From deliciously rich holiday fare to enticingly shiny decorations, the holiday season brings plenty of risky temptations for animals. Even if you are vigilant all year with your pets, it’s easy to get distracted with the extra responsibilities and extra people coming and going this season. Don’t let a pet accident or emergency put a damper on your festivities. Follow our expert advice to help keep your animals safe this holiday.

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Five Life-Lengthening Health Tips for Your Pet

Five Life-Lengthening Health Tips for Your Pet

By Lorie Huston, DVM | Article Featured on PetMD

Anyone who has ever had a dog or cat wishes just one thing — that he or she has a healthy and long life. Here are five tips that can help your pet do just that.

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10 Cat Exercises Your Pet Will Enjoy

10 Cat Exercises Your Pet Will Enjoy

Article Featured on Everyday Health

A workout for cats? Veterinary experts say a little exercise will help your feline friend stay in shape. Enticing your dog to get active with a walk around the block or a game of fetch is a no-brainer and a fairly common pet health practice. But when it comes to cats, many people don’t realize the value of exercise.

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The FDA says grain-free food could be killing dogs. Here’s what pet owners should know.

The FDA says grain-free food could be killing dogs

Article Featured on Popular Science

By Sara Chodosh

Last week the FDA made a scary announcement: grain-free food might be linked to a dangerous heart condition in dogs. This is actually the third update in a saga that’s been going on since July 2018, when the FDA first began investigating the link. But they’re not much closer to an answer, and there’s been a lot of misinformation about the mysterious rise in canine dilated cardiomyopathy circulating in the meantime.

For starters, it’s not just grain-free diets that seem to be the problem.

Continue reading The FDA says grain-free food could be killing dogs. Here’s what pet owners should know.

Dental Trouble in Pets: What to Watch For and How to Prevent It

Article Featured on Vetstreet.com

“Dogs and cats do not have self-cleaning teeth,” Dr. Bernadine Cruz of Laguna Hills Animal Hospital in Laguna Woods, California, says. “If their teeth are not taken care of properly, a large percentage of pets will have some type of dental disease by 4 years of age.”

Dental woes are more than just a toothache; they can also pose a serious threat to your pet’s well-being. That is because the condition of your pet’s teeth and gums can directly affect her overall health. Read on to learn about the top four signs of poor dental hygiene and the best ways to combat them.

1. Bad Breath

How often have you gotten eye to eye with a furry friend only to be put off by her breath? We usually explain away a pet’s bad breath as simply being “dog breath” or “cat breath,” as if it is a normal part of her being. However, unless your pet has just eaten something stinky such as tuna, it is important to recognize that bad breath is not normal and can indicate a problem with her dental health.

2. Discolored Teeth

Healthy canine and feline teeth are white. Any discolorations or stains should be examined by your veterinary team. In addition, buildup or darker areas on your pet’s teeth, particularly around the gumline, is another sign that something isn’t right with her dental health.

3. Red, Swollen or Bleeding Gums

Healthy gums are pink (although some breeds have pigmented gums). Gums that are red and swollen or are bleeding need attention.

4. Loose Teeth

Unless your pet’s jaw has been injured, loose teeth can be an indication of bone loss. You can determine if teeth are loose by gently pressing on them. But do so carefully, as this can be painful and even the most docile pet may bite.

What’s the Problem?

All of the above problems can be signs of periodontal disease, a disease that attacks the gums and teeth and can cause potentially life-threatening infections. Here is how it happens: Plaque builds up on your pet’s teeth. If it is not brushed away within 24 to 36 hours, it hardens into a yellow or brown substance called tartar, which can be removed only by a veterinarian (ideally, while the pet is under anesthesia). Over time, tartar that remains on your pet’s teeth also builds up under the gums. Tartar and bacteria eventually separate the gums from the teeth, forming gaps or pockets that encourage even more bacterial growth. At later stages of the disease, surgery may be needed to repair the damage, and affected teeth may need to be pulled.

Periodontal disease is painful for your pet and can lead to abscesses and loss of bone and teeth. It also presents other health risks. “If left untreated, dental disease can spread infection throughout the body,” Dr. Cruz explains. “When the health of the gums is compromised, the bacteria can get into the bloodstream and cause infection in your pet’s liver, lungs, kidneys and heart.”

Prevention Is the Key

The good news is that you can combat periodontal disease in your pet. Caring for her dental health really comes down to three simple steps:

  • Have your pet’s teeth cleaned professionally by your veterinarian on a regular basis.
  • Brush your pet’s teeth daily to help reduce the buildup of plaque.
  • Pay attention to your pet’s dental health. Check on her teeth and her gums regularly.

Visit Your Veterinarian

The first step in ensuring that your pet’s teeth are taken care of is to take her for professional dental cleanings.

For pets with healthy teeth and gums, cleanings are usually done about once a year. Pets that have severe periodontal disease may require more frequent visits. Your veterinarian will recommend a cleaning schedule based on your pet’s needs. Every pet is unique when it comes to dental disease. “Genetics, breed and luck all play a part in how often you will need to have your pet’s teeth professionally cleaned,” Dr. Cruz says.

One method of cleaning is to use an ultrasonic scaler. Its metal tip moves quickly and vibrates, using a stream of water to remove debris and plaque off teeth. Similar to what happens during a trip to your own dentist, your pet’s teeth will be cleaned both above and below the gumline and then polished.

Your veterinarian may recommend anesthesia for the procedure, because most pets will not sit still for their teeth to be cleaned under the gumline. Your veterinary staff will take plenty of precautions to make undergoing anesthesia as risk free as possible for your pet.

Your veterinarian may perform a preanesthetic exam and will most likely recommend a blood profile screening, which can help rule out preexisting problems that could affect the safety of anesthesia. In addition, today’s anesthesia is safer for dogs and cats. Recent clinical advances in anesthesia help ensure that your pet will be alert and virtually back to normal shortly after the cleaning.

Cleaning at Home

Home care is an essential part of keeping your pet’s teeth in tip-top shape. “The best time to start a dental routineis when you first bring home a puppy or kitten,” Dr. Cruz explains. “Your first goal is just to get her used to having her teeth and gums touched.”

Start by simply wiping your pet’s teeth with a damp washcloth wrapped around your finger. Offer your pet lots of praise for being cooperative. After she has gotten used to the washcloth, she can graduate to a pet-safe toothbrush. This method can also work on an older pet that has not previously received home dental care.

Once you are ready to start brushing your pet’s teeth, you will need two essentials:

  • Toothpaste specially formulated for pets. Pet toothpaste comes in all kinds of interesting flavors, including vanilla, beef, chicken and seafood. Avoid using human toothpaste, which can irritate your pet’s stomach if she swallows it.
  • A toothbrush. One that has been specially developed for pets (e.g., a little rubber finger brush for cats, a smaller brush for small dogs) is your best bet. You can always ask your veterinarian for advice on making the brushing experience a positive one for you and your four-legged friend.

You will find that regular professional cleanings, as well as the simple act of daily brushing, will help keep your pet’s teeth and gums healthier throughout her life. A little extra care in the short run will lead to important health benefits for years to come.

Toothbrushing Tips

  • Dampen the toothbrush first.
  • Press the toothpaste down to the bottom of the brush. This will help keep your pet from licking the toothpaste off the brush.
  • Take your time introducing this new routine into your pet’s life.

Fighting Dental Disease With Food

Diet can play a role in maintaining your pet’s dental health. Specially formulated dental diets are effective in fighting plaque and tartar buildup. For added assurance, look for the Veterinary Oral Health Council’s (VOHC) Seal of Acceptance. You can also ask your veterinary staff which diet they recommend.


Laurelwood Animal Hospital, located near Jesuit High School on Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway offers a full range of companion animal services, including surgery, nutrition and behavior counseling, parasite control and preventative medicine. The hospital also offers advanced imaging through an all-digital spiral CT scanner, a comprehensive dental program and laser treatment.

If you’re looking for quality, compassionate veterinary care in Beaverton, Oregon, come visit us at Laurelwood Animal Hospital.

Laurelwood Animal Hospital

9315 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway
Beaverton, Oregon 97005

Phone: (971) 244-4230
Fax: (503) 292-6808

E-mail: info@laurelwoodvets.com

Big Dog Basics: Everyday Issues For People With Giant Breeds

Big Dog Basics: Everyday Issues For People With Giant Breeds

Article Featured on Vetstreet | By Kim Thorton

Thinking of sharing your life with a Great Dane, Newfoundland, Irish Wolfhound or other giant breed? While these giant breeds can make great companions, there are a few things you need to think about before you commit. For starters, they eat more and take up more space — like most of the bed and all of the sofa. And they can pull you off your feet if they’re out on a walk and see something interesting off in the distance.

Giant breeds can also have health problems related to their size. Plus, their medications and medical bills can be more expensive. Emergencies aside, though, just living with them on a day-to-day basis can pose problems you might never have thought of. Here are a few things you should know before you go big.

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Fall Pet Safety Tips

Fall Pet Safety Tips

Article Featured on Douglas Feed & Pet Supply

Fall is a fun season to get out and about with your pets, but before you jump into that first pile of leaves, sip that first pumpkin spice latte, or walk down that first fall trail, it is important to keep your pets safe. Understanding autumn hazards and how to avoid them is essential for both you and your pet to safely enjoy fall.

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How to Care for Your Pet After Surgery

How to Care for Your Pet After Surgery

By Diana Bocco | Article Featured on PetMD

When it comes to post-operative care for pets, there’s no such thing as “standard procedure.” That’s because each cat and dog surgery and each pet is different.

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