Grill Safety for Pets

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Article by Ali Semigran | Found on Pet MD

Firing up the grill is one of the best—and, let’s face it, most delicious—outdoor activities to partake in during the summertime.

While grilling up meats and veggies can be a wonderful treat for family and friends at a cookout, it can be a dangerous activity if you have dogs or cats.

Of course, you don’t have to skip out on BBQ season if you are a pet parent. Rather, take the proper precautions to ensure that you and all your guests (furry, or otherwise) have a safe experience this summer.

By following this simple, but efficient guide, you’ll be able to grill up some yummy foods, all while ensuring your cat or dog is out of harm’s way. Continue reading Grill Safety for Pets

How to Communicate With a Deaf Pet

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Article by Mikkel Becker | Found on GreyMuzzle.org

One of the greatest challenges for an aging dog is hearing loss. Just because your pet may be losing his hearing, however, doesn’t mean he can’t continue to be a fully functioning member of your household. It simply takes a little creativity and training to bridge the communication gap.  Continue reading How to Communicate With a Deaf Pet

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

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Article by Alison Aubrey | Found on NPR.org

Dog owners often say the best thing about dogs is their unconditional love.

But new research suggests there’s another benefit, too. Dog owners walk more.

In a study published Monday in the journal BMC Public Health, dog owners on average walked 22 minutes more per day compared to people who didn’t own a dog.

And they weren’t just dawdling.

“Not only did we see an increase in exercise, but also the exercise was at a moderate pace,” explains study author Daniel Mills of the University of Lincoln, in the United Kingdom. Continue reading Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

The Top 10 Signs Your Dog May Be Sick (and What You Can Do About It)

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Article Found on PetHealthNetwork

Overview
As is the case with people, a dog’s health changes with age. Unfortunately, our pets age much faster than we do.

Symptoms
Regardless of your dog’s age, you play a key role in helping her combat illness and remain as healthy as possible. Remember, your dog cannot describe symptoms to you, but she can show you signs of disease. Awareness of the signs of the most common diseases is one way to help reduce your pet’s risk of being affected by them. It’s a little scary to consider that at least 10% of pets that appear healthy to their owners and their veterinarians during annual checkups have underlying diseases.1 Continue reading The Top 10 Signs Your Dog May Be Sick (and What You Can Do About It)

Dog Daycare: What’s Your Plan If You Have an Emergency?

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Article Found on DogHealthNews.com

Dog daycare may not be on your top priority list until your 85 year old uncle falls down the stairs, spends 4 days in the hospital, requires 3 weeks of physical therapy and needs to install a stairlift before he can go home and care for his dog who’s now your responsibility or even worse, you’re franticly in need of someone to foster your uncle’s 10 year old dog for several weeks and have no idea how your uncle and his dog will deal with  separation.

This news brief gives you an example of one dog owner’s emergency situation so you’ll have a strategy to create a care team for an injured dog owner and their beloved dog.
Continue reading Dog Daycare: What’s Your Plan If You Have an Emergency?

Why You Won’t See Your Dog’s Heartworm Symptoms, Until it’s Advanced

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Article by Dr. Mike Paul, DVM | Article Found on PetHealthNetwork

Heartworm disease is caused by a mosquito transmitted parasite. If left untreated, it can be a debilitating disease and sometimes prove fatal. Pets infected with heartworms can be found in all states, in spite of the fact that very effective heartworm prevention products are available. The good news is that I’ve noticed more and more pet parents are wondering about the symptoms of heartworm disease. Unfortunately, most of the time you’re not going to see any, and here’s why: Continue reading Why You Won’t See Your Dog’s Heartworm Symptoms, Until it’s Advanced

Declawing Linked to Aggression and Other Abnormal Behaviors in Cats

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Article Found on ScienceDaily

Declaw surgery (onychectomy) is illegal in many countries but is still a surprisingly common practice in some. It is performed electively to stop cats from damaging furniture, or as a means of avoiding scratches. Previous research has focused on short-term issues following surgery, such as lameness, chewing of toes and infection, but the long-term health effects of this procedure have not to date been investigated. Continue reading Declawing Linked to Aggression and Other Abnormal Behaviors in Cats

7 Tips to Keeping Your Dog Happy and Healthy

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Article Found on PRNewsWire.com

Dogs are man’s best friend, so it’s no surprise that in the United States there are nearly 80 million dogs as household pets – that’s about one dog for every four people. One of the easiest ways to keep your pup happy and healthy is through a mix of the right diet and exercise which together can boost immunity and energy, maintain muscle and promote healthy digestion. Below are seven tips to ensure you’re giving your best friend the best care possible. Continue reading 7 Tips to Keeping Your Dog Happy and Healthy

Cataracts in Dogs

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Article Found on Pet MD

Cloudiness of the Eye Lens in Dogs

Cataract refers to the cloudiness in the crystalline lens of the eye, varying from complete to partial opacity. When the eye lens (located directly behind the iris) is clouded, it prevents light from passing to the retina, which can cause vision loss.

Most cases of cataracts are inherited. For instance, Miniature poodles, American cocker spaniel, miniature schnauzer, golden retrievers, Boston terriers, and Siberian huskies are all predisposed to cataracts.

Symptoms and Types

Symptoms typically relate to the degree of vision impairment. Dogs with less than 30 percent lens opacity, for example, display little or no symptoms, whereas those with more than 60 percent opacity of the lens may suffer from loss of vision or have difficulty seeing in dimly lit areas. Continue reading Cataracts in Dogs

Health Officials Are Warning This Tick Season Could Be the Worst Yet

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Article by Justin Worland | Found on TIME

“This year, there are worse ticks than many of us have ever seen in our lives,” says Janet Foley, an epidemiologist at the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

Ticks are roaming American forests in greater numbers this year than any in recent memory leaving thousands of humans at risk for lyme disease, say public health officials. And things could get much worse through the summer if weather conditions remain humid, spelling trouble for the people who roam in their habitat. Continue reading Health Officials Are Warning This Tick Season Could Be the Worst Yet